Tag Archives: counseling work

Three Times My Last Words


It’s my turn now.  It’s my time.  Lights!  Camera!  Action!

The bright yellow, sticky paint envelops my pores as the pool rises and takes more surface.  Slowly, the suffocating embodiment of liquid color threatens to enter my nose.  I say “Bring them in!”

I cite every last crime before them.

“What are you talking about” they say, with confused expressions.

The paint bubbles with my efforts to push it back out with labored breaths and I realize the wasted effort spent frightened by my private thoughts.

Ah, let’s try again.

I touch the flame to my last boat and walk on to the beach.  The surf licks up against my ankles and my body is electric.  This will be my last chance to apologize before leaving the earth.  May forgiveness be my legacy.

She shakes her head and smiles.  “You never even spoke to me.  What did you want to say?”

Fooled again.  The thoroughbreds crush me two by two before I get the chance.  Again.

For the third time, I set the stage for my window of opportunity and motivation to break the spell of fear.  The vines are cut.  My safety net will dissolve and hold no further chance of protection.  With all my strength I jump.  Christina’s hands accept me.

And she says “This is all you had to do.”

Advertisements

Invitation Versus Demand


Question mark

Question mark (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I base my writing of The Jungle Pack Workbook (counseling), on the results witnessed from using finish-the-statement prompts.  I find that a lot of the question-asking comes across as trying to trick the client, to give up the gold (hidden personal information).  Also, I recognize the minimal education for growing kids and full-grown adults, in the context of how to build personal awareness.

Most people have a hard time with understanding their personal strengths and what triggers emotions in both themselves and others.  The prompts mentioned earlier, were designed to take the focus off of the person’s struggle to meet expectations of a counselor’s question.  One of the main elements I do my best to drop is any sense of testing.  Most people have experienced enough school-type testing to have a “right or wrong answer” state of expectations to deal with when posed a question.  When asked about information the child or adult is defending, the inquiry is thought of as a demand.  Obviously this did not work the first few hundred times in school, at work or in the home.

If a person is coming to me for counseling at any age, he or she has already met many reasons to defy trust in others.  Along with this, is a reoccurring propensity to feel angered with people.  The world already looks scary at this point.  Otherwise, the promise of confidentiality wouldn’t be considered so appealing.  But even in the counseling session, trust must be earned by the therapist.  And we find many times, this is no easy task in regards to the information which keeps a person stuck.