Tag Archives: Psychotherapy

Olympian Factor Of Relationship Skills


Fasce Olympians

Fasce Olympians (Photo credit: Marco Crupi Visual Artist)

Ever notice how Olympic athletes bring on the “edge of your seat” level of anticipation when performing a feat which would most likely kill the rest of us?  About twenty years ago, I started paying attention to the kinds of events which starred a single athlete either skating to a song or making a death-defying move off the bars.  And I have also read about what goes into accomplishment of such moments.

An Olympian eats, breathes and dreams the moves over and over on a daily basis.  The practice and honing of moves are a lifestyle and habit.  The observer into a period of this athlete’s life would shake his head in amazement and think “Wow.  Get a life.”

Why?  Because the life of an Olympian is not the life of an average person.  Average means influence of emotion and desires.  Average has no focused  path to follow through on.  Reaching sub-goals on the way to achieving an goal is not everyday and mediocre practice.  Devoting hours and days to a ritual that gradually trains the body to respond automatically to a certain stimulus, is not for the average life of just getting through the days until the weekend.

Quite a few people who come to my counseling office are familiar with the observer’s stance on the practice of implementing relationship skills.  For example, most friends and family members in any given person’s life are casting doubts and surprise when personal boundaries are announced.  The new behavior of setting a time-limit on phone calls with negative people is labeled as “selfish.”  And the therapy assignment to saying “No” to the usual requests at home or in the company of friends is sometimes met with astonishment, silly questions and the expression of anger.  This person is changing the game.  He or she (client) is not only working on a healthy relationship goal, but is also refusing to act like the same old piece of furniture in other people’s comfort zone.

In this case, average is not the rule of thumb.  The client’s determination to reach a healthier level of response to bullying or co-dependent behavior, will not permit the act of submission.  The remark “Well now you’re just being crazy” or some other kind of guilt trip will not influence the training.

 

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Time management in psychotherapy sessions


Aside from making sure that therapy sessions are actually effective, I also want to facilitate conversation or play in a way that uses time management.  The Jungle Pack workbook is with the intention of helping other therapists tune into their client‘s struggle with themselves and each of the multiple environments (school, home and community).  The prompts which cover universal situations for human beings of any age, gender and circumstance are meant to draw out conversation items.  On a week to week basis, I and others in my field are faced with a client’s sense of confusion and struggle to set priorities for conversation.  I will go ahead and speak for the lot of us and say that a therapist’s aim is to help the client (or consumer) to quit spinning his/ her wheels and move ahead.  Time management and having an anchor for conversation go hand in hand for effectiveness in the direction of feeling better and out of idle.

David W. Peace